Welcome to Marquette County.

The Upper Peninsula is a vast landscape that quickly overwhelms the unprepared. Da Marji, as referred to by locals, will fool you. Do your homework. Believe the stories. Prepare. Marquette County trails are littered with rocks, roots, and punchy climb after punchy climb hammering you into submission. Since 2015 our average DNF rate is 60%. Weather in the U.P. can be defined as unpredictable. We encourage you to prepare for everything from the possibility of all-day rain or even flurries. Not kidding.

The coveted Marji Gesick belt buckle is awarded to those that can complete the 100-mile course in under 12 hours. Many have tried. Almost all have failed. They usually return to complete their unfinished business.

100-MILE BIKE

THE ORIGINAL MARJI

50-MILE BIKE

THE HARD(ER) HALF OF THE 100

100-MILE RUN

12K FEET OF VERTICAL ON FOOT

50-MILE RUN

HILLS, HILLS, HILLS

100-MILE DUATHLON

THE WORST OF BOTH WORLDS

15-mile bike

GRIT REQUIRED

200-MILE BIKE

THE OUT & BACK

“I’ve done some hard stuff. Leadville, Maah Daah Hey 100, Heck Epic, La Ruta de Los Conquistadores, Lumberjack 100, Butte 100.

Hands down, Marji is the most terrible of them all.” – ‎Matthew Webb‎

OUR SPONSORS

We could not put on great events without great companies to support us. All of our partners have a commitment to adventure in the U.P. and contribute to make the event what it is today.

Prepare for the inevitable

with our official training plans

We’ve partnered with Rob Lee, one of the top endurance coaches in the world, to build training plans for every level of rider. If you’re looking for a personal best on our short race or you’re trying to reach the podium on our long race we’ve got ya covered. The weather up here in The U.P. is unpredictable, prepare for it.

Learn More

When you sign up for the Marji Gesick mailing list

It’s all about community.

While a lot of races out there are run by for-profit companies, that’s not the case for Marji GesickPolar Roll and The Crusher. All of our events are productions of the 906 Adventure Team, a 501(c)3 whose mission is to empower people to become the best version of themselves through outdoor adventure. We don’t have a large staff of people (two, to be exact) or significant overhead, and that enables us to donate a significant portion of race revenues in two ways:

  1. Since 2015, we’ve given back more than $110,000 to the trail-builders of RAMBA, NTN, Sisu Dirt Crews, WinMan and the DCNT.
  2. We also support youth adventure programs in three communities, investing over $35,000 this year alone in equipment, training, and gear to remove barriers for all kids. Our summer and after-school programs now have over 350 participants, and spots fill up as quickly as Marji Gesick. There is a need we’re trying to fill: to connect kids with their communities and get them off devices.